Recent Storm Damage Posts

When Storms Hit, SERVPRO Is Ready!

3/20/2019 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Coffee, Dale, Geneva & Henry Counties specializes in storm and flood damage restoration.  Our crews are highly trained and we use specialized equipment to restore your property to its pre-storm condition.

Faster Response

Since we are locally owned and operated, we are able to respond quicker with the right resources, which is extremely important. A fast response lessens the damage, limits further damage, and reduces the restoration cost.

Resources to Handle Floods and Storms

When storms hit, we can scale our resources to handle a large storm or flooding disaster. We can access equipment and personnel from a network of 1,650 Franchises across the country and elite Disaster Recovery Teams that are strategically located throughout the United States.

Have Storm or Flood Damage? Call Us Today at 334-699-5961.

SERVPRO helps out local school

10/29/2018 (Permalink)

Local school has water damage after storm

SERVPRO  was on the scene quickly when one of our local schools called and said that they had substantial water damage as a result of a storm that came through the area. SERVPRO responded quickly and began the cleanup process.  

Flooding and water damage events are often complex with numerous issues that require a knowledgeable and flexible response. Whether we’re dealing with a relatively small water cleanup scenario or a large scale event, we work quickly to assess each unique situation and isolate the damaged area. In many instances, normal operations can continue in a temporary space while we restore your facility.

Restoring Commercial Properties Presents Unique Challenges

Our professionals are trained to be mindful of legal and environmental concerns and strive to fully restore the damaged area while working within your budgetary constraints. We understand that every hour spent cleaning up is an hour of lost revenue and productivity. So when an emergency situation arises in your business, give us a call and we’ll be there fast with the help you need.

Hurricane Michael Response

10/15/2018 (Permalink)

Hurricane Michael Response

Like all other First Responders, our dedicated crews are working around the clock to help all those in need. We are in full storm mode and have pulled in additional crews, equipment, and resources from surrounding SERVPRO franchises in order to help everyone that needs service.   We ask for your patience and understanding; we are attempting to get to everyone as quickly and as safely as possible.

The Wiregrass area was very fortunate that there was no loss of life but the impact of this hurricane was severe. This has been an unprecedented weather event in our area and some people and businesses will be without power for days; complete recovery will take much longer. 

We appreciate your patience and we won't stop working until everyone receives service.

Wiregrass Electric Coop Outage Update

10/15/2018 (Permalink)

Wiregrass Electric released a map with new estimates for power restoration.  They have been working around the clock to restore power to their customers but the damage to the infrastructure was severe.  You can read their press release here.  This map is also color coded by impact; the red shaded area is what the cooperative is referring to as "ground zero" where the heaviest winds and damage took place.

They are asking for everyone's patience and understanding while they work around the clock to clear trees, replace power lines and poles, and make sure that when power is restored, its done safely.  According to their press release, they will have roughly 225 lineman working in our area by last night.

They will be updating the current outage numbers, by substation, every morning and evening.

Tornado Facts

10/4/2018 (Permalink)

The most powerful Tornadoes occur in the United States.

A typical tornado only lasts for a few minutes.

Every tornado has its own color, sound and shape.

You need to step on the pedal of a car pass 70 miles per hour to outrun the fastest tornadoes.

The chances that a tornado is a F5, the highest classification for a tornado on the F-scale, is less than 0.1%

Tornadoes have been reported in every state in the US and also in every season.

A Tornado can occur at any time, but most often between 3pm and 9pm.

The direction in which a tornado twists depends a lot upon which hemisphere you're in. In general, most tornadoes in the northern hemisphere rotate cyclonically, or counter-clockwise. Only around five percent of tornadoes in the northern hemisphere rotate clockwise, or anti-cyclonically.

Emergency Preparedness Kit

10/4/2018 (Permalink)

Every household should have an emergency plan in place before a disaster happens.  And part of that plan should include a stocked, ready to go, emergency preparedness kit.

An emergency preparedness kit is usually needed for you to survive for at least 72 hours. Make sure to keep an emergency kit at home and in your vehicle. Most items are easy to find and inexpensive:

Water – 1 gallon of water per person per day for at least 3 days

Food – Non-perishable food for at least 3 days

Manual can opener for food

Flashlight

Batteries

Hand crank radio or battery powered radio

First aid kit

Whistle

Matches

Dust Mask

Local Maps

Cell phone with chargers and a backup battery

Prescription medications

Infant formula, diapers, wipes, bottles

Interesting Weather Facts!

2/13/2018 (Permalink)

  • The highest temperature ever recorded in Antarctica is 14.6 °C (59 °F), recorded on January 5, 1974. More temperature facts.
  • The most rainfall ever recorded in 24 hours is 182.5 centimetres (71.9 inches) in Foc-Foc, La Réunion, during tropical cyclone Denise on January 8, 1966.

  • The most rainfall ever recorded in one year is 25.4 meters (1000 inches) in Cherrapunji, India. More rain facts.
  • The highest snowfall ever recorded in a one year period was 31.1 meters (1224 inches) in Mount Rainier, Washington State, United States, between February 19, 1971 and February 18, 1972. More snow facts.
  • The fastest wind speed ever recorded is 484±32 km/h (301±20 mph). This was a 3 second gust recorded by a Doppler on Wheels (DOW) radar unit in Oklahoma City on May 3, 1999. More wind facts.
  • The heaviest hailstone ever recorded weighed 1.0 kg (2.25 lb) and landed in Gopalganj District, Bangladesh on April 14, 1986.
  • Clouds can be categorized into a number of different types; these include cumulus, stratus and cirrus. More cloud facts.
  • The Earth experiences millions of lightning storms every year, they are incredible discharges of electricity from the atmosphere that can reach temperatures close to 54,000 °F (30,000 °C) and speeds of 60,000 m/s (130,000 mph). More lightning facts.
  • The USA has more tornadoes than any other country in the world, averaging around 1200 a year. This is due largely to its unique geography which forms an area in central USA called “Tornado Alley” which is frequently hit by tornadoes. More tornado facts.
  • Tropical cyclones (often referred to as hurricanes or typhoons) feature strong winds, driving rain, rough seas and areas of low atmospheric pressure. They frequently form in tropical areas of the globe and can do considerable damage to populated areas. Examples of this include the 1970 Bhola cyclone, Typhoon Nina which hit China in 1975 and more recently in 2005 when Hurricane Katrina which caused great devastation and loss of life when it hit southern parts of the USA. More hurricane facts.

http://www.sciencekids.co.nz/sciencefacts/weather.html